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Sanctuary Cities and States Have Seceded from the Union

Article author: 
Fay Voshell
Article publisher: 
American Thinker
Article date: 
April 9, 2017
Article category: 
Immigration Impact
Medium
Article Body: 

New York City seriously contemplated seceding from the Union just before the outbreak of the Civil War...

But veiled in all the rosy political rhetoric was the hard and pragmatic fact that New York was a central hub of the slave trade, inextricably tied to the South’s cotton empire. Money did the real talking...

That is how ungovernable NYC liked it then -- and apparently still does now, having declared itself a sanctuary city; and thus, essentially free of following federal and state laws concerning immigration.

... While [NYC mayor] Wood failed in establishing a city separate from the rest of the USA, some American cities such as San Francisco and Miami have succeeded in so doing. By declaring themselves “sanctuaries,” dozens of American cities essentially have seceded from the Union and have created an ungovernable archipelago of city states within America.

The sanctuary cities have declared themselves above the rule of law and feel free to disrupt the national unity by setting themselves outside the law and federal governance -- all on the basis of supposed compassion for the alien, when it is clear some of the underlying and murky motives include vote getting and cheap labor...

One is reminded of Italian Renaissance city-states...

The one way or the highway mentality of today’s so-called sanctuary cities has been extended to colleges and universities, which are fast seeing the disappearance of free speech in favor of leftist Newspeak advanced under the banner of transgenderism and sanctuary policies regarding non-citizen students.

This is to say nothing of the ideological secession of states like California, which is seeing some call for the entire state to become a sanctuary state...

In one of his most famous speeches, Lincoln noted the continual agitation and roiling of the nation over slavery:

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.

I believe this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free.

I do not expect the Union to be dissolved -- I do not expect the house to fall -- but I do expect it will cease to be divided.

It will become all one thing or all the other.

Either the opponents of slavery, will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward, till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new -- North as well as South.”

America finds itself in a situation similar to that of the pre-civil war era due to the question of immigration: either the Republic will be united in favor of citizens governed by constitutional law; or it will succumb to the idea of sanctuary lawlessness at the expense of citizens...