First group of delayed young deportees approved

Article publisher: 
9 News/AP
Article date: 
12 September 2012
Article category: 
National News
Medium
Article Body: 

Just three weeks after the Obama administration started accepting applications from young illegal immigrants seeking to avoid deportation and get a work permit, the government already has approved some of the roughly 72,000 applications the government has received.

According to the DHS document, it could cost between $467 million and $585 million to process applications in the first two years of the program, with revenues from fees estimate at $484 million. That means the cost to the government could range from a gain of $17 million to a loss of more than $101 million.

The first wave of approvals comes months head of DHS' own estimates of how long the application process for the administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program could take - and less than 60 days before the Nov. 6 elections. According to an internal DHS document obtained by The Associated Press, the department's Citizenship and Immigration Services had estimated that each application could take several months to be completed.

Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, has derided the policy as "backdoor amnesty."

"It's astounding that the president's administration can move so quickly to grant work authorization to illegal immigrants yet his jobs council hasn't met in over eight months to find solutions to put unemployed Americans back to work," Smith said Tuesday. "Such a quick turnaround for these amnesty applications raises serious concerns about fraud and a lack of thorough background checks. President Obama and his administration continue to put illegal immigrants ahead of the interests of the American people."

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CAIRCO suggested additional reading for current and projected employment numbers b, September 4, 2012 click here to open -

Workforce:  2010 through 2020
- Projected Job Growth -
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report
  • AGES  16 to 24 years old    -12.4%  (negative)
  • AGES  25 to 54 years old         1.4%  (positive)