Mobile home parks become immigrants’ [and illegal aliens] home away from home

Article CAIRCO note: 
From Article: But there is another layer of vulnerability here: To live in the U.S. without papers is to live with ongoing uncertainty - it is much worse now that Trump is president...
Article publisher: 
Vail Daily and AP
Article date: 
15 September 2019
Article category: 
Colorado News
Medium
Article Body: 

The Aspens Mobile Home Village sits on a wedge of land tucked between eastbound I-70 and the Eagle River in the mountains near Vail...

As in other mobile home parks, the residents own the trailers and rent the lot spaces, which, here, run around $1,100 a month. This does not include gas, electric or cable. The manager is Agustina Del Hoyo, who since 2008 somehow has navigated the line between enforcer and mother hen. She says she is not certain how many people actually live in the Aspens, but one night she did go through and count 525 vehicles ,,,

We have people here from all over, from Russia, from Bulgaria, from Jamaica, from Honduras, we have Vietnamese, but about 75 percent are Latino,” she says.

Most are immigrants. As in many immigrant communities, some arrived legally and some didn’t....

Home is what they have built or are building in Aguascalientes or Chihuahua or Guerrero with the money they’ve sent back, the houses waiting there, paid for by all the beds changed and carpets vacuumed and drywall installed here...


“I live with my heart divided,” says another mother, who has lived in Avon for nearly 22 years, the last five of those in the Aspens. She crossed the border illegally, leaving behind her parents, most of her siblings, her nieces and nephews,...

But during their many years in Avon, residents have married and their children were born or grew up here.

But there is another layer of vulnerability here: To live in the U.S. without papers is to live with ongoing uncertainty and the ever-present thrum of anxiety. They say it is much worse now that Trump is president...