How State Legislatures Can Break the Power of Corrupt Big-City Machines in Presidential Elections

Article author: 
Rob Natelson
Article publisher: 
Epoch Times
Article date: 
January 30, 2021
Article category: 
National News
High
Article Body: 

The author has written a five-part series on election fraud and election integrity. Excerpts from this series are included below:

Don’t Be Fooled! Don’t Let Them Divert Us From Ensuring Electoral Integrity!:

... Those trying to turn the Capitol incident into an impeachment know there’s no time, or grounds, for impeachment. They also know that President Donald Trump didn’t incite illegal behavior. Anyone can see that by reading his allegedly objectionable words. (I have reproduced them at the end...) ...

The goals of this diversion apparently are to (1) move public attention away from election irregularities and the legitimacy of the Biden presidency, (2) forestall honest investigation into those irregularities, and (3) prevent corrective action....

Anyone can see that by reading his allegedly objectionable words. (I have reproduced them at the end...

And while it’s not widely known, state legislatures are near the heart of our constitutional system. They have power to force changes in federal operations—in some cases, even without the consent of their governors....

Item 1: Constituents must educate state lawmakers about their constitutional role and motivate them to fulfill that role....

Item 2: Reform state election laws....

Item 3: This applies in states with histories of big-city or university town-vote corruption....

Item 4: Persuade as many state legislatures as possible to endorse the “Convention of States” application for constitutional amendments....

Saving America and Election Integrity: Part 2:

Here are the principal jobs the Constitution assigned to state lawmakers:

  • Govern the internal policies of their respective states (including areas into which the feds have since intruded, such as health care and education).
  • Approve or veto changes in state borders.
  • Approve or veto new national enclaves within state boundaries, such as military bases, federal office complexes, and some national parks.
  • Regulate congressional elections, subject to limited congressional override.
  • Approve or veto proposed constitutional amendments.
  • Propose amendments through a meeting of state delegations called a “convention for proposing amendments.”
  • Decide how presidential electors are chosen. Last summer, the Supreme Court ruled (pdf) that state legislatures may even tell electors how to vote.

State legislatures may exercise several of these important responsibilities—including choice of electors and their constitutional amendment powers—without their governor’s consent....

Saving America and Election Integrity: Part 3:

... The first is sometimes called the Elections Clause, but because the Constitution has several “election clauses,” a better name is the Times, Places, and Manner Clause (Article I, Section 4, Clause 1).

The Times, Places, and Manner Clause states:

"The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.”...

Next, the Constitution (Article II, Section 1, Clause 2) gives state legislatures power over presidential electors. It says:

“Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors …”

The third constitutional provision limits somewhat the legislature’s power in presidential elections. It’s called the Same Day or Presidential Vote Clause (Article II, Section 1, Clause 4). It reads:

“The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.”

There was one huge election irregularity no one is discussing, but which was undeniable: States throughout the country ignored both the Constitution’s Same Day Clause and federal law in carrying out the 2020 popular vote....

How State Legislatures Can Break the Power of Corrupt Big-City Machines in Presidential Elections:

... Dubious vote totals generated by big-city Democrat machines allegedly swung enough states to take the presidency away from Donald Trump and hand it to Joe Biden.

Why can the machines do this? They can because all but two states choose their presidential electors at large. Whatever candidate wins a bare plurality of the popular vote in the state takes all of that state’s electors....

The Constitution doesn’t require that presidential electors be chosen statewide. Each state’s legislature decides that....

The Republican legislatures in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin should consider supplementing election law reform with a district method for choosing presidential electors....