Rep. Brooks: Congress Has ‘Absolute Right’ to Reject a State’s Electoral College Votes

Article author: 
Jack Phillips and Jan Jekielek
Article publisher: 
Epoch Times
Article date: 
November 20, 2020
Article category: 
National News
Medium
Article Body: 
Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) said that the final outcome of the presidential election may be decided according to the 12th Amendment and Article One and Article Two of the U.S. Constitution when Congress convenes in early January.
 
“The ultimate say over whether to accept or reject” Electoral College votes for any state “is not a court’s job,” he said. “It is Congress’s job under” the Constitution “coupled with federal statutes that govern this issue.”
 
“Congress has the absolute right to reject the submitted Electoral College votes of any state, which we believe has such a shoddy election system that you can’t trust the election results that those states are submitting to us, that they’re suspect,”...
 
...  “on January 6th at 1 p.m. Eastern time, the 50 states will report to Congress, the president [of the] Senate will preside over this meeting” and “will report to Congress what they contend are their Electoral College results in their state.”
 
“If a House member and a senator objects to the submission of Electoral College votes by any state, that immediately triggers a House floor vote and a Senate floor vote on whether to accept or reject those Electoral College votes submitted by that particular state,” the Alabama Republican said. “The amount of debate on the House and Senate floor is limited to two hours under federal law.”...
 
... under the 12th Amendment, the House would then determine who the president will be, while the Senate will determine the vice president....
 
...  a similar situation unfolded nearly 200 years ago during the contingent election of 1824, which saw John Quincy Adams—who was the “second-place finisher”—elected president, since no candidate won a majority of the electoral vote....
 
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